Cities

Introduction

This blog started out as an exploration of walking in the country, as you might expect, but I gradually became aware that this was too narrow and began to extend my postings to cover walks in towns and cities. I apply the same "voyage of discovery" philosophy to both, so why not include urban walks as well? I started applying the generic label (key word) "city" to all such walks, but I have lately come to the conclusion that it would be more interesting, at least in England, to apply "city" more rigorously - only to those settlements which are entitled to call themselves cities. All others will have the label "town".

This opens up the obvious definitional question, and this is addressed below. But it also offers an interesting new project - to walk them all. Later on this page there is a list of all 51 English cities (list from Wikipedia or Love My Town, which both have further information), with links to the walks I have so far done.  I have done some sort of walk, sometimes more than one, in over half of them, especially of course those in the south.

I think this is all quite exciting, but Ange's reaction was to groan, and mutter about feelings of oppression. I think it will have to be a low profile project, pursued opportunistically ...


What is a city?

Generally of course the term "city" describes a large urban settlement, but the precise definition is often elusive. In England there is a widespread belief that having an Anglican cathedral is a requirement, but exceptions clearly exist, notably Guildford. It seems that there are three bases upon which current English cities are so called:

1 They have been known as cities since time immemorial.
2 The establishment of an Anglican cathedral (e.g Ripon in 1836 or Truro in 1877).
3 The title was awarded by Letters Patent from the monarch.

Cities under the third category have recently been the result of competitions: Millenium (Brighton and Hove, Wolverhampton); Silver Jubilee 2002 (Preston); Golden Jubilee 2012 (Chelmsford). There are - of course - no explicit criteria.

One especially salutary tale concerns Rochester (courtesy of the UK Cities website): Rochester had held city status since 1211, but ceased to officially be a city because of an administrative oversight. The former Rochester-upon-Medway City Council neglected to appoint ceremonial Charter Trustees when Medway became a unitary authority in 1998. Unfamiliar with the archaic rules governing city status, they did not realize that Charter Trustees would be needed to protect the city's status. Consequently Rochester was removed from the Lord Chancellor's official list of UK cities.

List of English cities (51 in all)
Total now walked: 33

Bath
Birmingham
Bradford
Brighton
Bristol
Cambridge
Canterbury
Carlisle
Chelmsford
Chester
Chichester
Coventry
Derby
Ely
Exeter
Gloucester
Hereford
(Kingston upon) Hull
Lancaster
Leeds
Leicester
Lichfield
Lincoln
Liverpool
London: City of London
London: City of Westminster
Manchester
Newcastle upon Tyne
Norwich
Nottingham
Oxford
Peterborough
Plymouth
Portsmouth
Preston
Ripon
Salford
Salisbury
Sheffield
Southampton
St Albans
Stoke-on-Trent
Sunderland
Truro
Wakefield
Wells
Winchester
Wolverhampton
Worcester
York



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